I’m lost and I wish I were found, in the arms of My Darlin’ Hometown…

Alan LeQuire’s bronze and limestone sculpture presides over the Music Row Roundabout in my hometown of Nashville, intended to convey “the importance of music to Nashville”.  If you know much about my beloved South, you will understand that those easily offended (they’re naked!) called for its removal at its installation in 2003.  We all calmed down eventually, or at least got tired of shouting about it, and these days it is a mostly beloved iconic figure representing music in all its forms (we have a wonderful symphony too).  I love music, and many of my posts feature lines from songs I particularly enjoy and/or find relevant.  A case in point would be My Darlin’ Hometown, a song by the great John Prine that speaks to those of us who live far away from home.  My hope is that anyone interested might dig a little deeper, check out the music in question, or even better buy a song or a CD and give it a listen…you waste more money than that driving driving around every day, and music is much more fun!  (30 March, 2010  Nashville, TN)

I once had a girl, or should I say, she once had me…

If you get curious, as I did, you can look in the Itunes store and find 606 versions of The Beatles’ song Norwegian Wood on offer.  First released on Rubber Soul in 1965, it is a simple and beautiful song on which the great George Harrison plays a sitar, the first time any rock band had done so.  Some argue that the song’s lyrics are trivial, but such was the case for most of the music of the day (and maybe for all days).  Lennon was the primary writer assisted by McCartney, and oddly enough it’s not about Norway at all…it’s about a girl Lennon was fooling around with who decorated her place using cheap Norwegian wood furnishings, which he lit on fire when he trashed the place at the end of the song!  Not a very kindly message for a song that is so gentle on the ears.  I stumbled across my favorite version of the song, literally, while checking out the Tennessee Aquarium in Chattanooga with Sweetie a few years ago.  Dan Landrum was playing the song on his hammer dulcimer outside, busking for tips and CD sales; I bought one of everything he had.  If you’ve never heard anyone play a hammer dulcimer, I strongly suggest you start with Dan- a virtuoso at the top of his game.  The image below was shot on hike in the quiet and gentle Norwegian woods near Oslo, where Landrum’s hammer dulcimer would not be out of place.  (24 September, 2011 Sognsvann, Norway)