I’m lost and I wish I were found, in the arms of My Darlin’ Hometown…

Alan LeQuire’s bronze and limestone sculpture presides over the Music Row Roundabout in my hometown of Nashville, intended to convey “the importance of music to Nashville”.  If you know much about my beloved South, you will understand that those easily offended (they’re naked!) called for its removal at its installation in 2003.  We all calmed down eventually, or at least got tired of shouting about it, and these days it is a mostly beloved iconic figure representing music in all its forms (we have a wonderful symphony too).  I love music, and many of my posts feature lines from songs I particularly enjoy and/or find relevant.  A case in point would be My Darlin’ Hometown, a song by the great John Prine that speaks to those of us who live far away from home.  My hope is that anyone interested might dig a little deeper, check out the music in question, or even better buy a song or a CD and give it a listen…you waste more money than that driving driving around every day, and music is much more fun!  (30 March, 2010  Nashville, TN)

Keeps me searching for a heart of gold, and I’m getting old…

They’re California gold tokens, souvenirs peddled to newcomers and tourists who wanted a piece of the action…but didn’t necessarily want to pan for it.  The family story about this pair is that a relative went out to San Francisco around the time of the Gold Rush, probably to see about getting rich quickly, and ended up working at the US Mint for a few years before hustling on back to God’s country.  Seems the vast majority of people who got rich during the Gold Rush did so by selling things like supplies, shelter and “comfort” to the miners.  The little tokens came to Tennessee with him to live their sheltered lives in drawers and jewelry boxes, handed down through the generations as though they were crown jewels, though in reality they might be worth the cost of a couple of beers today in Oslo.  Like most things I guess, the real value lies in the story, not the possession.  (13 July, 2011  Brentwood, Tennessee)