I’m lost and I wish I were found, in the arms of My Darlin’ Hometown…

Alan LeQuire’s bronze and limestone sculpture presides over the Music Row Roundabout in my hometown of Nashville, intended to convey “the importance of music to Nashville”.  If you know much about my beloved South, you will understand that those easily offended (they’re naked!) called for its removal at its installation in 2003.  We all calmed down eventually, or at least got tired of shouting about it, and these days it is a mostly beloved iconic figure representing music in all its forms (we have a wonderful symphony too).  I love music, and many of my posts feature lines from songs I particularly enjoy and/or find relevant.  A case in point would be My Darlin’ Hometown, a song by the great John Prine that speaks to those of us who live far away from home.  My hope is that anyone interested might dig a little deeper, check out the music in question, or even better buy a song or a CD and give it a listen…you waste more money than that driving driving around every day, and music is much more fun!  (30 March, 2010  Nashville, TN)

Here’s a little tip I would like to relate, big fish bites if ya’ got good bait…

They’re called stockfish, and for centuries this was mostly what Norway had to trade with the rest of the world.  These guys were hanging around on our tour of the Hanseatic Museum in Bergen.  The Hanseatic League (we were told by our comely German tour guide) was an organization of German merchants who set up enclaves in mostly Northern European cities to serve as trading outposts.  They had a pretty good deal going there while it lasted, though required to live a bachelor existence, embrace celibacy, and endure a number of other restrictions of the “no more fun of any kind” variety that were popular in the Middle Ages.  The game plan was to go abroad, get rich buying from and selling to the locals, and then hand off the business to the next Hansa and go home to live happily ever after in the big house with the good German girl and raise the next generation.  They prospered for several hundred years following this formula, but you know what happens to all good things in the end.   My title comes from a song by the great blues musician Taj Mahal…if you like the blues at all and aren’t familiar with his work, get with the program!  (16 August, 2011  Bergen, Norway)